We’re heading to Munich! Reply

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London Connext Conference 2014 and 2015 events brought power DDS users together from a wide range of industries to share experiences, applications and expertise. For those of you who were unable to attend but curious about what you missed, head over to Community and view a list of the presenters and some of the presentations (2014 and 2015). For our third year, we wanted to switch things up a bit, and the first big change to the event is the location: we’ll be hosting our two-day event in Munich!

The second change (and the one I’m most excited to announce) relates to our agenda. In the past, we’ve created an agenda that showcases our users and their work through a curated selection of keynote presentations, demonstrations, and smaller group presentations. This year, in addition to these, we’re going to be offering 2 workshops! The first workshop focuses on using Connext Pro Tools and the other will dive into Connext DDS Secure. During these workshops, you’ll have time to get up and running with the products, ask questions and receive answers from RTI staff, and more.

This is just a sampling of what we’ll be offering. To register now, head on over to https://www.rti.com/munich-connext-con-2017. Also, if you’ll be attending and would like to be considered for a keynote spot at this year’s conference, please visit the conference page for submission details. We can’t wait to see you there!

Getting Started with Connext DDS – ELI5, please. Reply

GettingStartedBlog

One of my favorite subreddits is r/ELI5. For those of you who might not know, ELI5 is a forum, dedicated to offering up explanations of user-submitted topics and concepts in a very specific way – explaining it in a way that even a 5-year old would understand, hence ELI5 (Explain it Like I’m 5).

ELI5 is a pretty popular subreddit. Why? Well, I believe it’s because there are tons of things we don’t know much about (we’re all experts in one area or another, but we don’t know everything!), and these posts give us a chance to gain some basic knowledge outside our area of expertise. Making information simple benefits everyone. Simplicity doesn’t mean a lack of complexity. Being able to take a complex subject that you’ve spent years immersed in, and distil it down to some facts and anecdotes that provide a level of working understanding is amazing – it makes information accessible.

ELI5 doesn’t mean the thing you’re describing isn’t interesting, valuable or worthy of more time and attention. Being able to ELI5 allows people with little to no domain knowledge or context on these more complex and nuanced subjects to understand the basics and to incorporate those basics into other things. It’s general, but it’s useful. If you can give a 5-year old a working understanding of things such as what is a product?, why do we have a president?, or what is middleware?, you really have to understand what you’re talking about.

From my perspective, DDS is powerful – and can be complex – and we hope we’ve made it accessible enough that you can do amazing things with it.

At RTI, we’ve been working behind the scenes to bring you something new. In the spirit of my favorite subreddit, I want to introduce you to Getting Started – all the tools and information you need to get started with DDS.

We explain how to use our products, how to go from install to helloworld, what DDS is (whitepapers), how people are using it, how you can setup the basics using our full sets of configuration files and code to address your most common and challenging use cases (case+code) and more. We’ve even curated special collections of content to meet your needs so you don’t have to wade through everything. And this is only phase 1 – we have so much more information that’s just waiting to go live, and we’re excited to share it.

Ready to take the leap? Check out the first step! Installation for Linux or Windows, take your pick!

And as part of making sure you’re getting what you need, let us know. What would you find valuable to get up and running using DDS? What questions did you need answers to, but had trouble finding? What content did you wish was available that wasn’t when you first started using our product? Tell us or leave a comment!

Well Being over Ethernet Reply

Guest Author: Andrew Patterson, Business Development Director for Mentor Graphics’ embedded software division (Thank you, Andrew!)

Mentor Embedded on the NXP Smarter World Truck 2017

Mentor Embedded on the NXP Smarter World Truck 2017

One of the larger commercial vehicles present at CES 2017 was the NXP® Smarter World Truck – an 18-wheeler parked right outside the Convention Center.  It contained over 100 demonstrations making use of NXP products showing some of the latest innovations in home-automation, medical, industrial and other fields.  Mentor Embedded, together with RTI, worked with NXP to set up a medical demonstration that showed data aggregation in real-time from medical sensors. By collecting medical data, and analyzing it in real time, either locally or in a back-office cloud, a much quicker and more accurate diagnosis of any medical condition can be possible.  Mentor Embedded’s aggregation gateway made use of the multicore NXP i.MX6, a well-established platform, running our own secure Mentor Embedded Linux®.  The technology we specifically wanted to highlight in this example was DDS (Data Distribution Service), implemented by RTI’s Connext® DDS Professional.  The DDS communication protocol, based on a physical Ethernet network, allows multiple sensor nodes to link to a hub or gateway, so it is appropriate for many medical and industrial applications where multi-node data needs to be collected securely and reliably.

Traditional patient monitoring systems have made use of client/server architectures, but these can be inflexible if reconfiguration changes are needed, and they don’t necessarily scale to a large number of clients in a large-scale medical or industrial installation. DDS uses a “publisher” and “subscriber” concept – it is easy to add new publishers and subscribers to the network without any other architecture changes, so the system is scalable.

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In the publish-subscribe model there is no central data server – data flows directly from the patient monitor source to the gateway destination.  In our demo medical system, the data sources are individual sensors that put data onto the Ethernet network when the new readings are available.  Data is tagged for reading and accessed by any registered subscriber.  Once received by the subscriber gateway, the data can be uploaded to a cloud resource for further analysis and comparisons made with historical readings. Further trend analysis can be made over time.

The process for adding a new node to a publish-subscribe network is straightforward. A new data element announces itself to the network when it attaches, optionally describing the types and formats of the data it provides. Subscribers then identify themselves to the data source to complete the system reconfiguration.

Mentor Embedded and RTI medical applications demo where multi-node data needs to be collected securely and reliably

Mentor Embedded and RTI medical applications demo where multi-node data needs to be collected securely and reliably

DDS provides a range of communication data services to support a variety of application needs, ranging from guaranteed command and control, to real-time data transmission. For example, if it is required to send a “halt” command to a specific node, there is a data service type that guarantees error-free delivery, so sensor data transmission stops immediately. There are also time-sensitive modes, useful when there is time-sensitive data, which require minimum network latency.  Less time-critical data can make use of a “best effort” service, where transmission is scheduled as a lower priority than the time-sensitive communication.

Our demonstration setup is shown in the picture on the left in the NXP Smarter World Truck 2017. The NXP i.MX6 quad core system was linked to a 10” touch-screen display, showing patient graphs.  The Mentor Embedded Linux operating system included the RTI Connext DDS protocol stack, the necessary drivers for high-performance graphics, and the Ethernet network connections. Other options include a fastboot capability and wireless communication links for cloud-connectivity.  For more information please visit Mentor Embedded Linux.

To see when the NXP Smarter World Truck is coming near you, visit the schedule at iot.nxp.com/americas/schedule – it is being updated frequently, so keep a watch on it!

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